Pregnancy Week to Week

Pregnancy Week by Week Information

Pregnancy Week 13

Week 13 of pregnancy is a great time of relief because, at this point, most women are more likely to carry their pregnancy to term. A little over 2 inches and barely under 3 inches long, the fetus weight about .7 ounces during week 13. By the end of the week, the baby’s eyes will have moved closer together from the sides of the head, the intestines will have extended more fully into the body, and the pancreas will have begun making insulin. Because of the growing bundle inside the uterus, many women will begin feeling round ligament pain during week 13. Round ligament pain consists of a curt jabbing pain in the lower abdomen which may be followed by a lingering ache lasting for a short while. Although completely normal when making sudden movements or changes in position during week 13 and on, if the pain is accompanied by cramping, vomiting, or bleeding a physician should be notified immediately.

Sometimes, the incapacity to bear children cannot be determined until this week.
A miscarriage in the later terms of pregnancy could signify an incompetence cervix. This means that the cervix is too weak to remain closed during pregnancy and the baby will arrive too soon. However, even in this rare case, a procedure known as a cerclage can be used to sew the cervix closed and deliver a healthy baby to term. Women tend to start feeling healthier and more energetic during week 13. Also, most women report that their libido returns at week 13 and find that they are more sensitive in all areas of their body, including the genitals, because of increased blood flow. Intercourse and orgasms can be very arousing at this point. However, it is important to reassure each partner that intercourse during this week can be perfectly safe if it is not a high risk pregnancy. The breasts continue to grow during this week and develop more benign bumps than usual.

Pregnancy Week 12 | Pregnancy Week 14


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